I believe that I was a little bit in love with you

Hey, My name is Maddy but I prefer my middle name Stewart and here you're going to find a mess of Lord of the Rings, Doctor Who, Sherlock, Merlin, Les Misérables, knitting/crocheting, Avengers, Battlestar Galactica, Star Trek, Welcome to Night Vale, The X-Files, Elementary, Hannibal, and Game of Thrones.


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Reblogged from acanoeandlifejackets
Reblogged from supergleefuldoctorwolflock

How to tell how much of a Marvel fan the people in the movie theater are:

shadowjumpingsherlock:

will-graham-willgraham:

cupcakeforger:

supergleefuldoctorwolflock:

Stage 1: Those who leave as soon as the movie ends

Stage 2: Those who know to stay until the credits for the extra scene

Stage 3: Those who stay until the end of the credits for the second extra scene

I’m a stage three. 

We all are

Stage 4: those who will stay until the ushers kick them out because they don’t trust marvel

(via lucifertoldmeto)

Reblogged from raktajino-hot
Reblogged from ghostierdead-deactivated2014021

natural-killer-cyborg:

ghostier:

i hate when people go “i dont credit fanartists as Real artists because its fanart and they should draw more original art” ok yeah that patronizing attitude is nice and all but you know like… every piece of classical art is fanart of the bible

im sorry da vinci, the last supper doesnt COUNT as real art because its not original art and you should make some ocs

I think I just found the most compelling argument toward fanart ever

(via flootzavut)

Reblogged from scarlettjohanson

harry potter minimalist character posters

(Source: scarlettjohanson, via dobbyhasnomasters)

Reblogged from txchnologist

txchnologist:

The Chance To Dance Again

by Michael Keller

We highlighted the TED talk of Hugh Herr a couple of weeks ago. But his work is too important and beautiful to leave to just one post.

The MIT associate professor of media arts and sciences is making prosthetic limbs and exoskeletons that restore function in those who have lost legs from injury or disease. This set of gifs focuses on his team’s BiOM powered ankle and foot prosthesis

"Bionics is not only about making people stronger and faster," he said during the talk. "Our expression, our humanity can be embedded into electromechanics."

To prove his point, Herr and fellow researchers studied dance movement to replace the lower leg that professional dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost after last year’s Boston marathon bombing. He concluded his talk by bringing Haslet-Davis on the stage to perform a bionic rumba. 

Read More

(via madslegs)

Reblogged from meme-meme
meme-meme:

science

meme-meme:

science

(via bumbletigger)

Reblogged from teenwit
Reblogged from toptumbles
mauridianhallow:

lambishwolf:

toptumbles:

This is called humanity


I have nothing to say on this, these people are the pinnacle of human compassion, and that is all there is to it.

mauridianhallow:

lambishwolf:

toptumbles:

This is called humanity

I have nothing to say on this, these people are the pinnacle of human compassion, and that is all there is to it.

(via ashleysrambling)

Reblogged from sixpenceee

nonsensicalnoelle:

lajeune-surlefeu:

sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE

SCIENCE

Sooo cool.

(via dobbyhasnomasters)